Collaboration and team science: Top ten take aways

Community member post by L. Michelle Bennett and Christophe Marchand

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L. Michelle Bennett (biography)

What are the key lessons for building a successful collaborative team? A new version of the Collaboration and Team Science Field Guide (Bennett et al., 2018) provides ten top take aways:

1. TRUST
It is almost impossible to imagine a successful collaboration without trust. Trust provides the foundation for a team. Trust is necessary for establishing other aspects of a successful collaboration such as psychological safety, candid conversation, a positive team dynamic, and successful conflict management.

christophe-marchand
Christophe Marchand (biography)

2. VISION
A strong vision attracts people to the team and provides a foundation for achieving team goals. A captivating vision provides a focal point for interesting individuals to join the team and compels them to contribute to the work. It serves as an anchor for the team and over time, the vision needs to be brought back to the team, reviewed, discussed, and, as needed, revised.

3. SELF-AWARENESS AND EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE
Emotional Intelligence among team members contributes to the effective functioning of research teams. Self-awareness gained through much self-reflection, -learning, and -inquiry benefits the leader(s) and participants by enhancing their ability to build relationships. Vision alone is not enough to sustain the team. Vision must be accompanied by the ability to build and nurture strong relationships. This provides people with greater control over their own emotional reactions, improves the quality of their interactions, and perhaps most importantly helps build other-awareness. The better someone gets to know and understand themself, the better they will appreciate those who surround them. Continue reading

What can interdisciplinary collaborations learn from the science of team science?

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Suzi Spitzer (biography)

How can we improve interdisciplinary collaborations? There are many lessons to be learned from the Science of Team Science. The following ten lessons summarize many of the ideas that were shared at the International Science of Team Science Conference in Galveston, Texas, in May 2018.

1. Team up with the right people
On the most basic level, scientists working on teams should be willing to integrate their thoughts with their teammates’ ideas. Participants should also possess a variety of social skills, such as negotiation and social perceptiveness. The most successful teams also encompass a moderate degree of deep-level diversity (values, perspectives, cognitive styles) and include women in leadership roles. Continue reading

Two types of interdisciplinary scholarship

Community member post by Andi Hess

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Andi Hess (biography)

Would it be helpful to identify two distinct forms of interdisciplinary scholarship ― 1) individual interdisciplinarity and 2) interdisciplinary dialogue and team science ― and to make this distinction explicit in the literature? What are the benefits and challenges of each? Are a different set of resources and methods required to achieve effective interdisciplinary scholarship?

As integration scientists are aware, there are many analyses of appropriate methods for conducting interdisciplinary work. Each has its own benefits and challenges, and each requires a different set of resources and methods for achieving effective interdisciplinary scholarship. Continue reading

Creating community around the Science of Team Science

Community member post by Stephen M. Fiore

Stephen M. Fiore (biography)

How can we create new academic communities? I provide lessons from building the Science of Team Science (SciTS), a rapidly growing cross-disciplinary field of study. SciTS works to build an evidence-base and to develop translational applications to maximize the efficiency and effectiveness of team-based research.

I particularly draw lessons from the recent 8th annual conference attended by approximately 200 people. The conference aimed to:

  • disseminate the current state of knowledge in the SciTS field along with applications for enhancing team science;
  • provide opportunities to discuss future directions for advancing SciTS to improve the global scientific enterprise; and,
  • provide opportunities for interaction amongst a diverse group of stakeholders, including thought leaders in the SciTS field, scientists engaged in team-based research, institutional leaders who promote collaborative research, policymakers, and federal agency representatives.

Continue reading

Bringing the Immunity-to-Change™ process to the scientific community

Community member post by Erica Lawlor and Cheryl Vaughan

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Erica Lawlor (biography)

How can scientists whose careers were formed in an incentive system that cultivates competitive and territorial behaviors be helped to meet the expectations of collaborative research frameworks? A team-based approach that transcends disciplinary boundaries may be a tall order for scientists who “grew up” in a system where funding and promotion are based upon a proven record of individual contributions to a field of research. But that is the direction in which much of science is heading. Continue reading

Team science glossary

Community member post by Sawsan Khuri and Stefan Wuchty

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Stefan Wuchty (biography)
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Sawsan Khuri (biography)

As team science gains momentum, we present this glossary to standardize definitions for the most frequently used terms and phrases in the science of team science literature, and to serve as a reference point for newcomers to the field. Source material is provided where possible. Continue reading