Blog statistics

The Integration and Implementation Insights (i2Insights) blog aims to strengthen a global network of researchers who share methods, frameworks, processes, concepts, theories and competencies to better understand and act on complex societal and environmental problems.

Every quarter we review selected statistics about the blog to determine how well we are progressing towards achieving our aims. Here we report those statistics to the end of March 2021. The next update (to end June 2021) will be published in July 2021.

Statistics are reported for:

Global coverage

The blog aims to share tools for tackling complex societal and environmental problems across all countries.

Number of contributors by country

Figure 1 shows the number of people who have contributed blog posts from different countries. To end March 2021 there were 417 authors from 40 countries, with first-time contributions from Belgium and Egypt. The bulk of contributions still come from a small number of countries.

Additional information: The year that a country first contributed is provided at: https://i2insights.org/about/#milestones.

Technical note: Each contributor is counted only once, even if they authored and/or co-authored more than one blog post. If a contributor is a first author and a co-author on different blog posts, they are counted only as a first author. If an author is affiliated with more than one country, the country of residence at time of first publishing is counted.

Number of views by country

Since the blog started there have been views from 183 of the 193 nations that are members of the United Nations (Figure 2).

Technical note: This map is provided in the statistics collected by WordPress. The darker the colour, the more views.

Popularity of posts

Distribution of blog post views

The number of views that blog posts have received over their lifetime is shown in Figure 3. There is no obvious pattern that explains why some blog posts are viewed more often than others. To end March 2021: 

Additional information: Some information about the most popular blog posts can be found in the annual state-of-the-blog reviews.

Technical note: These numbers are based on views via each blog post’s unique URL. These figures are underestimates of each blog post view, as blog posts can also be viewed via the home page, blog scroll or any page showing a list of posts as excerpts. From the beginning of January to end March 2021, 8% of views were not via the unique URL but instead via the home page, any page showing a list of posts as excerpts, or the blog scroll.

Change over time

The blog aims to maintain a consistent schedule of publication, in line with the number of posts submitted. More significantly it aims to increase visitors and views over time. It also aims to provide a forum for discussion by providing the opportunity for viewers to comment on blog posts. It also aims to increase discussion over time.

Number of blog posts published

Figures 4a and 4b show the number of new blog posts published each month (blue bars) and the accumulated number of blog posts published in previous months (‘old’ posts; red line). Figure 4a provides statistics to end December 2020 and Figure 4b provides statistics from January 2021 onwards. (NB Figures 4a and 4b use different scales on the vertical axis.)

Additional information: From April 2017 the number of blog posts published each month was deliberately reduced compared with earlier months. Since then there has been a regular publication schedule of one blog post per week (very occasionally two), with a two week break from late December to early January. To avoid a significant back-log of blog posts building up, two blog posts per week were published in February 2021.

Number of visitors and views per month

Figures 5a and 5b show the number of visitors to the blog each month (black line), as well as the number of views of all blog posts in that month. The bar for the number of views is divided into coloured blocks as follows:

  • Red block: views of new posts ie., views of posts published sometime during that month
  • Dark green block: views of most popular old post outlier – A guide to ontology, epistemology, and philosophical perspectives for interdisciplinary researchers by Katie Moon and Deborah Blackman
  • Green block: views of other old posts ie., views of posts other than the popular outlier published in previous months
  • Blue block: other views of blog posts eg via the home page or blog scroll, labelled “home page etc” (blue bar)
  • Orange Block: other page views; this includes the about page, index and instructions to authors (only shown in Figure 5b).

Figure 5a provides statistics to end December 2020 and Figure 5b provides statistics from January 2021 onwards. (NB Figures 5a and 5b use different scales on the vertical axis.)

Although there are fluctuations, there is a trend towards an increase in the number of visitors and views over time. Further analysis is undertaken on the number of views in Figures 6, 7 and 8.

Technical note: The number of views of new posts, most popular outlier and old posts are based on views via each blog post’s unique URL. The number of views labelled “home page etc” is based on views of the home page, any page showing a list of posts as excerpts, or (after May 2020) the blog scroll. Views of individual blog posts cannot be distinguished on these pages. See also technical note attached to Figure 3.

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Number of views per month adjusted by number of blog posts

Figures 6a and 6b show the views of new and old posts are divided by the number of relevant blog posts:

  • the new posts are divided by the number of new posts published in that month
  • the old posts (excluding the most popular outlier) are divided by the accumulated number of posts published in previous months (minus one).

Figure 6a provides statistics to end December 2020 and Figure 6b provides statistics from January 2021 onwards.

Mean of blog post views in the first three months after publication

Figures 7a and 7b show the average views blog posts accrued over the first three months after publication, plotted against the month of publication.

Figure 7a provides statistics to end December 2020 and Figure 7b provides statistics from January 2021 onwards.

Although there is a lot of fluctuation from month to month, the annual mean (of blog post views in the first 3 months after publication) has increased steadily: 313 (2016), 440 (2017), 475 (2018), 565 (2019), 612 (2020).

Technical note: These numbers are based on views via each blog post’s unique URL, which (as discussed in the technical note for Figure 3) underestimates the total number of views. The views do not take into account the actual date of publication and are tallied across the month in which the blog posts were published plus the two subsequent months. The error introduced is likely to be small as most views occur in the week following publication. The mean (rather than the median) is used and the same trend is observed with the median.

Monthly median of lifetime blog post views

Figures 8a and 8b show the median each month of the views blog posts had accrued over their lifetime to that date. By and large the median of the lifetime views has been increasing steadily and was 659 in March 2021.

Figure 8a provides statistics to end December 2020 and Figure 8b provides statistics from January 2021 onwards.

Technical note: These numbers are based on views via each blog post’s unique URL, which (as discussed in the technical note for Figure 3) underestimates the total number of views. The median (rather than the mean) is used to reduce the influence of the outliers shown Figure 3.

Number of comments

Figures 9a and 9b show the number of comments made on blog posts in each month. Most comments are made on new blog posts. There was an increase in the number of comments from 2017 onwards, with considerable fluctuation from month to month subsequently, with no obvious explanation. There is no real trend towards an increase in comments with the following annual means: 22 (2016), 48 (2017), 34 (2018), 42 (2019) and 47 (2020).

Figure 9a provides statistics to end December 2020 and Figure 9b provides statistics from January 2021 onwards.

Technical note: Each individual comment is counted, including responses by blog post authors to comments made and any back-and forth discussion that may have ensued.

Overall technical note: The statistics shown on this page are drawn from those provided by WordPress, and should be seen as indicative only, given the limitations inherent in such data collections.

GB request – email: Fri, 15 Jan 2021 13:37:34 +1100. Title: RE: blog stats. Below image sizing was mocked up; 15 Jan 2021. Shows a number of different image sizes.
Dec-2020-number of visitors and views per month
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Dec-2020-monthly median of lifetime blog post views
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Dec-2020-monthly mean of blog post views in the first three months after publication
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Dec-2020-distribution of blog post views
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